TITLE TALK

50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 1967 BIG TEN CHAMPIONSHIP SEASON

1967 Team

1967 RESULTS (8-2, 6-1 BIG TEN - T1st)
Sept. 23 vs. Texas A&M (at Cotton Bowl) W 24-20 Highlights
Sept. 30 #1 NOTRE DAME W 28-21 Highlights
Oct. 7 NORTHWESTERN W 25-16 Highlights
Oct. 14 at Ohio State W 41-6 Highlights
Oct. 21 OREGON STATE L 14-22 Highlights
Oct. 28 at Iowa W 41-22 Highlights
Nov. 4 at Illinois W 42-9 Highlights
Nov. 11 MINNESOTA W 41-12 Highlights
Nov. 18 MICHIGAN STATE W 21-7 Highlights
Nov. 25 at Indiana L 14-19 Highlights

2017 GAME PROGRAM SPOTLIGHTS
Jack Mollenkopf Letter to Mike Phipps

1967 SEASON IN REVIEW

Coming off their Rose Bowl victory over USC, replacing All-American quarterback Bob Griese was priority No. 1 for the Boilermakers in 1967. According to the season outlook in the 1967 media guide, "The position was not solidly commanded by any one player in spring drills."

The early favorite was junior Mike Engelbrecht, but sophomore Mike Phipps burst onto the scene and, when Engelbrecht was injured prior to the season opener against Texas A&M, Phipps got the starting nod. So started a snappy three-year run during which the Boilermakers went 8-2 each season. Phipps had a strong arm, could run and was not afraid to lay out a block when needed.

Phipps and junior halfback Leroy Keyes helped 10th-ranked Purdue defeat No. 1 Notre Dame 28-21 at Ross-Ade Stadium on Sept. 30. Phipps threw a pair of second-half touchdown passes - 11 yards to Keyes and 31 yards to senior halfback Bob Baltzell - and Keyes preserved the win with an interception. The game featured 98 passes, 63 by Notre Dame and 35 by Purdue.

Phipps and the Boilermakers were featured on the ensuing cover of "Sports Illustrated," unequaled exposure in those days and a first for Purdue.

Two weeks later, the Boilermakers, who had climbed to second in the national rankings, built a 35-0 halftime lead en route to a 41-6 victory at Ohio State, prompting Buckeye head coach Woody Hayes to say, "In all my years here, this is the best Purdue team I've ever seen."

Following a 22-14 home loss to Oregon State on Oct. 21, the Boilermakers reeled off four straight wins, including three in a row in which they scored at least 41 points. Purdue was 6-0 in the Big Ten and needed to beat Indiana in the season finale in Bloomington to win the conference championship outright. The Hoosiers and Minnesota both were 5-1.

Keyes, who had been suffering from chest and rib injuries, played sparingly, and Indiana's Mike Baughman recovered a fumble at the Hoosier 1-yard line with six and a half minutes remaining to seal a 19-14 victory. The result was a tri-championship. Since Purdue had gone to the Rose Bowl the previous year, Minnesota in 1961 and Indiana never, the Hoosiers were rewarded with the trip to Pasadena.

Keyes scored 19 touchdowns (13 rushing and six receiving) to set a Purdue season record, and he led the nation with 114 points en route to being honored as the Big Ten Most Valuable Player, a consensus All-American and third in balloting for the Heisman Trophy (behind UCLA quarterback Gary Beban and USC running back O.J. Simpson). He was one of a school-record eight Boilermakers to earn first team All-Big Ten honors, along with Phipps, senior end Jim Beirne, junior middle guard Chuck Kyle, junior linebacker Dick Marvel, senior end George Olion, senior tackle Lance Olssen and junior fullback Perry Williams.

The Boilermakers topped the Big Ten in total offense (450.7 yards per game) and total defense (259.0 yards per game), as well as average attendance (60,113).

From "Purdue University Football Vault: The History of the Boilermakers," written by Tom Schott and published in 2008.

ALL-TIME PURDUE BIG TEN FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS
1918-tri
1929
1931-tri
1932-co
1943-co
1952-co
1967-tri
2000-tri

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